Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Bravo

Thanks so much for all your nice comments on my dress. I wore it to my son’s High School graduation ceremony last week. I made a point of linking back to the blogs of “new to me” commenters, and as a result I added a load of blogs to my Google reader subscription list.

While I was working on the dress, I had to set everything aside, and attend a Bra Workshop and Lecture I was signed up for. I was not really interested in sewing bras, but I always sign up and support garment/fashion related classes put on by the local ASG organization. Otherwise the course offerings start to skew into the realm of “Glitzy embroidery techniques for tote bags made of felted sweaters, pet hair, and dryer lint”. My thoughts about sewing bras: the fabrics are hard to find and sew, the construction techniques are difficult, and what with all the wonderful things RTW bras can do, why would I need to sew them?

The question "What kind of problems do you have with your current bras?” was on the pre-class questionnaire. When I reviewed my answer, “cup shape is not the same shape as I am, the shoulder straps fall off, and the back band hikes up” I started to think I might benefit from the class after all.
The class included a bra fitting session, a customized bra pattern, hands on sewing instructions and the guarantee that you would leave the class with a complete, custom fitted bra. The instructor was Anne St Clair, owner of Needle Nook Fabrics in Wichita, Kansas. She has become known as “The Bra Lady” on the sewing expo and ASG education circuit.

Day 1 - Anne fit each of us in a bra during a short, private 1 on 1 session. She had brought close to 90 sample bras for the fitting exercise. During the fitting she noted any changes that needed to be made to the pattern. That evening after class, she and her assistant Janet, hand drafted a custom pattern for each of the attendees, based on the changes noted during the fitting. We received a packaged bra pattern, either the Elite and Queen Elite based on our bra size, plus customized pattern pattern pieces, as well a list of the exact lengths for the elastics for the band bottom, under arm and center front, and the underwire size.
Anne encouraged us to compare our customized pattern pieces to the packaged pattern pieces so we could see the modifications she had made.
The afternoon of day 1 was a lecture on what makes a well-fitting bra, and how to make changes to the pattern to achieve it. Also discussed was modifying the pattern to make nursing, exercise and sleep bras. And making bras out of nontraditional fabrics like poly/lycra , cotton/ lycra, and wovens. To “support” her lecture, Anne would lift up her T shirt, made in a cute cotton/lycra print and show us on her own bra, which was made in the same fabric as the T shirt. We were all a bit startled the first time she did it, but it was a very good visual.

The second day of class we were split up in groups. Each group was guided through all steps of the bra making process, from cutting the fabric through the final step of sewing on the straps. I was surprised to find that the sewing was not that difficult. The stitching was either straight or zigzag, with a decorative stretch stitch thrown in as an alternative to the zig-zag. The seams are all rather short so sewing went quickly. Tricot fabric, used for the lining on the cup, can be a bit slippery, but there were tips and tricks taught on how to deal with it. Roseana’s blog post has great pictures of the class she took with Anne and the tips. Class Pictures

At the end of the day we tried on our completed bras for a final fit confirmation by Anne. We left the class with the completed bra, and enough fabrics and elastics remaining in the class kit to make two additional bras. I was amazed that I had a completed bra and how well it fit. The cup shape modifications Anne made included dropping the cup seam by ½ inch so that it crossed my apex, and removing some of the curve in the center front cup seams. My straps stay in place because they are none stretch and cut to the length I need for each shoulder, one of which is lower than the other. The straps are attached to the bra above the apex in the front and closer to the center in the back so there is no slippage. We were told that RTW bras have stretch straps with adjusters in order to fit a wider range of customer shapes. With custom made straps the only stretch needed, for ease of movement, is provided by a small piece of elastic where they are attached to the back band. And the back band stays horizontal across my back. It is also one size smaller than I was buying in RTW, but the difference that makes to the fit is incredible and it is not uncomfortable.
Anne had prepackaged bra kits with unique fashion fabrics and matching elastics, tricot, power net /mesh and hooks for sale for $12-15. This was a great price for a kit that includes all the materials to make a bra. Especially since the bra fabrics, plush back elastics, appropriate laces and the fittings; rings, underwire, or hooks, cannot be found in local fabric stores.
My only dissatisfaction with the class was the printed instruction materials. The pattern instructions and the separately purchased book were not complete and the illustrations were poor. Sewing steps were left out or in a different order than presented in class and the illustrations were originally black and white photos that had been rendered fuzzy and unrecognizable by copying copies instead of originals. So the week following the class, I sewed a couple of the kits together to reinforce the steps in memory and added notes to the instructions. Here is the rather basic bra as completed in class; thin tricot cups, high front, underwired, no padding.

My second bra was to made from a poly/ lycra animal print knit. The key to using other fabrics successfully is to maintain the structural integrity of the bra by compensating for the different weights and stretch of the materials used. In this one the fashion fabric is used over the power net of the band and the tricot of the cups so that the original stretch and support is maintained.

My third bra had some light padding (fusible fleece), a poly cotton nude knit with the same stretch characteristics as tricot for the cup lining, and a woven jacquard poly nylon fabric cut on the bias for the cups. Again the power net and cup lining maintains the support.




I am really glad I took this class. I learned so much about bra fitting and alterations. Being shown the steps for constructing a bra eliminated all my concerns about sewing nylon stretch fabrics. And I can take the learning’s from the class and apply them to the sewing of other bra, swimsuit, and corset patterns that I have in my collection. Here are some recent purchases.



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20 comments:

Myrna said...

Great write-up. I took a bra sewing workshop a few years ago and loved it. I've sewn Elan 645 numerous times. It's a great pattern. Thanks for showing the strap. We weren't taught that way in my class. Our straps are elastic. I'd like to try that. How are they stitched? How long is the bit of elastic? Thanks.

Carolyn (cmarie12) said...

Anne is the Queen of Bras! I met her several years ago and love her! You got some great bras out of this exercise. It will be interesting to see how you move forward with the new bra patterns!

Sarah C said...

WOW!!! I wish I could take a class like that! It sounds absolutely amazing! I am blown away! I love that you can by the kits for $12-15 when good RTW bras can be $40-50. Great job!

dd said...

Those bras look great! I love the swimsuit pattern. Can it be purchased online? I hope to be able to take a bra making class when the sew n expo comes here.

Sandy Huntress said...

That looks like a fantastic class to take, Audrey! Love your animal print bra. :-)

I've been thinking about making my own bras lately, but information and supplies are scarce locally. I've seen a few books, but they're quite expensive.

Have fun with your new skills!

Connie said...

Is it appropriate for me to say how nice your bras look?! They are so pretty! I just know if I made some, they would look like a hot mess- maybe a class in bra making is the ticket!

Lynneb said...

It's a fascinating concept to me...making my own bras. Thank you again for such a detailed and informative post. I wonder...how do you feel about the seam across the center of the cup? And is there such a thing as making a seamless cup?

kbenco said...

Thank you for your detailed review of this class. I am very impressed with the bras you have made.

Alexandra said...

Thank you for the review! I'd love to take a class like that.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

Those bras are truly amazing! So professional! I keep saying I have no interest in making my own bras because the $12 Target ones fit me perfectly, but you all are wearing me down...

melissa said...

oh I am SO jealous! I wish there was a class like this near me!! It's taken me four bras to get a fit good enough to wear on a daily basis, but I still have some tweaks to go. You're so so lucky to get a custom pattern made for you!

j.kaori said...

Sounds like a great class! Very professional-looking results. I still haven't mustered up the courage to try to make bras/lingerie yet!

Gail said...

Your bra making has produced some lovely ones. I never make bras, but whenever I need new ones I wish I did.

Sigrid said...

SOunds like a wonderful class. It's so nice to be able to make your own, well fitting bra's. You already used some lovely fabrics as well. Looking forward to what you will sew from your new patterns.

Powderpuff said...

I am so impressed, the bras look great and you can now have so much fun with fabrics and variety in your bras. RTW bras are expensive and I always think I have to be sensible with plain black, tan and white.

Carole said...

I loved your excellent review of the Bra Lady's class. I missed her when she was last in town but I'm determined to take the next opportunity to sign up when she returns. You did such a good job with your bras, and I paid particular attention to the fact that you made three in a row to fix the process in your mind. That's how I like to do things, so I'll use that information when I do get to take the class.

Summer Flies said...

Wow, I'd love to take a bra making class and get a custom fit. I have very small back but large in the front and it makes it very hard getting good bras. Having said that, I don't know if I'd have the time. I like the last pattern there that would allow me to wear a back less dress with a bra which is what I need.

Thank you for your comment about my jacket.

Robyn said...

Sounds like a great class and it was great to see the other versions you'd made up as well.

Chriswriter said...

Thanks so much for posting this! I've been trying to find out what I'd learn from this class, with this woman. This is exactly what I needed to know, gotta go sign up up now before it fills up!

Laurel said...

I, too, took Anne's class a few years ago. Their work is truly a labor of love and fitting expertise. It is the MOST comfortable bra I have ever worn, after making custom fit bras for years for myself. Your bras look wonderful. I encourage any interested woman to take a stab at sewing their own bras. It is truly worth it!